Early Locks and Dams
 
 
 
Lock & Dam Number River Miles (from Pittsburgh) Location Date Opened Web Links Cost Locks on which side? Replaced By Feet Dam Lifted River
33  405.1 3 miles above Maysville 1921   $1,580,209   Meldahl 7.0
34  434.1 Near Chilo, Ohio 1925 here $3,437,073 Ohio  x Meldahl 5.6
35 451.1 One mile below New Richmond, Ohio 1919    $    1,868,849  Kentucky Markland 6.4
36 460.9 Between Coney Island and Silver Grove 1925    $    3,708,534  Kentucky Markland 7.9
37 483.2 Just downriver from Taylorsport, a.k.a.
Fernbank
1911 here  $    1,314,178 Ohio Markland 7.8
38 503.3 McVie (a.k.a. Maxwell) 1924 here  $    2,857,040  Kentucky Markland 7.3
39 531.7 Where Markland Dam is today 1921 here  $    2,222,448  Indiana Markland 6.0
40

There was no dam 40.  A Dam was planned between Markland and Louisville, but Herbert Hoover, an engineer, and at the time, President, toured the river in October of 1929 to, among other things, determine the need for an additional dam.  Water levels were high from rains, the market crashed 6 days later starting the Great Depression, and that was it for dam #40.

41 604 Louisville 1921       McAlpin  

   

  At the left is an "out-of-the-water" view of one of the early types of dams.  Hydraulics opened and shut it to control water height. Meldahl opened in 1962, and replaced dams #31 (Rome, Ohio, below Vanceburg) and #32 (Portsmouth, Ohio). in addition to #33 and #34.  Meldahl lifts the river 30 feet; Markland lifts it 35.  Markland opened in 1963.  Both Markland and Meldahl have two locks, one that's 110 x 600 feet, and one that's 110 by 1200 feet.  Markland is at the 531.5 mile marker from Pittsburg; Meldahl at 436.2.