other scenes

Newport, Kentucky

Map of Newport, 1838
from a Map of the City of Cincinnati / from actual survey by Joseph Gest, city surveyor, 1838;
engraved by Wm. Haviland.  You can find the full map on the site of the Library of Congress.


Newport, Kentucky Newport, Kentucky
Newport Power Sub-Station, c. 1890 Innes Piano Co., Newport


The Stag Cafe Ball Team

The Stag Cafe Ball Team, c. 1953
Thanks to Bob Adams for this one.


Newport, Kentucky Newport, Kentucky
Dr. Phyhian's Hospital,
810 Washington, Newport
The Jenkins Hospital,
n.e. corner of 7th & Isabella

Learn more about these two early Newport Hospitals, here.

Thanks to Kyle Randall for letting us post here his Dr. James Oliver Jenkins & The Jenkins Hospital. (pdf)


Newport, Kentucky Newport, Kentucky Newport, Kentucky Newport, Kentucky
Front and Back Newport Sand and
 Gravel Co., 1897
How about a Willys-Knight for
Christmas, from the Newport
Motor Car Co., at 27 E. Sixth
Street, and from Santa, who
seems to be wearing brown.


Dorsals    Dorsals

Dorsal's Flour, with “Miles of Smiles”
Image on the right is a blow up of a section of the image on the left, so you can mostly read the label


Newport, Kentucky 

A few words from 1915 on Newport's former YMCA, here.
There was a YMCA in Newport from about 1894 to 1899.

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rjyt Newport, Kentucky Newport, Kentucky
Trolley Car Barn,  1910,
11th and Brighton Streets
During the 1937 Flood,
11th and Brighton Streets.
Scene from the Newport
Trolley Barn
Inside the Trolley Barn, c. 1915
from an Eddie Donlin post of Facebook
The Trolley barn was erected in 1903.

Newport, Kentucky

The Green Line in Newport

Newport, Kentucky Newport, Kentucky Newport, Kentucky
Third and Saratoga, 1910
(Trolley says “Fort Thomas”
on the front)
Newport Chamber
of Commerce, 1922
10 W Fourth
Brighton Center, 1966
founded by Rev. Bill
Neuroth, in 1966


Newport, Kentucky Newport, Kentucky Newport, Kentucky

These three are from Newport's 150th Anniversary Celebration
Play of re-enactment on the left, the parade of November 8, 1945 in the center, and that
dour looking group on the right were the celebration planners, a.k.a. The Newport-
Campbell County Sesquicentennial Commission, in session.

Helen Lindsey's account of the celebration's events is here. (pdf)

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Newport, Kentucky

Fireman at the Reed Manufacturing Co. in Newport


Newport, Kentucky Newport, Kentucky
Newport (?), 1913 The Thiem Sisters

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You can read the 1855 court case in regard to the Newport Ferry, at this site. Ten slaves owned by prominent Newport Citizens escape.  Story here.
“Newport. I am sorry to make the statement, but it is true, there are a number of subscribers to The Freeman [An African-American Newspaper from Indianapolis] who cannot read, but take the paper for the young men,  and many of them had to give up the paper because their sons are too indolent or thoughtless to read the news to the old folks.  Young men, equip yourselves with the race doings, and be prepared to overcome these obstacles that may arise to detain your progress.”  from Indianapolis' The Freeman, A National Illustrated Newspaper, August 9, 1890.
“Oct. 23, 1844.  A manufactory of silk at Newport, established by Wm. B. Jackson and Brother; handkerchiefs, and other goods of smooth and excellent texture;  cocoons raised, and silk spun and woven in Kentucky.”  - from Collin's History of Kentucky.  “January 21, 1854. At the New York crystal palace exhibition of the industry of all nations, the highest premiums were awarded for the following articles from Ky. : 1. Silver medal to the Newport silk manufacturing company, for perfection and general excellence of silk from the cocoon of Ky. growth.” - from Collin's History of Kentucky.
Kentucky Flag. – Pike, our readers know him well, is swimming in deep water. He has removed his paper from Maysville to Newport, Ky., and is now publishing it daily and weekly. It is printed on new type and presents a beautiful appearance. It is edited with a little more than his usual vigor and energy, which were always considerable. But this was to be expected, as he has more room to swim in.” The Lancaster (Ohio) Gazette, December 5, 1851
Here's one writer's description of Newport in 1817. Story of 10 slaves who escaped from Newport, here.
“The Newport cotton mill in Kentucky, owned by Thos. O'Shaughnessy, was destroyed by fire. Loss $100,000, partially covered by insurance. Over 100 persons are thrown out of employment. The fire was caused by some sparks from a furnace entering a room filled with cotton.” from the Daily Alta California, July 16, 1854
Report of gipsies [sic] camped in Newport in 1858, here. In 1884, a father shoots a man for ruining his daughter's honor, here.
Nancy Miller arrested in Newport for aiding a slave to escape, here. An 1819 Cincinnati directory lists these steamboats as built in Newport.
“The Newport, Ky., Polo Club play the Henley Club, of this city[Richmond, Indiana] to night, and tomorrow at Ridge Rink.” Indianapolis Sentinel, April 24, 1885 “There are eighty-six licensed beer saloons in Newport, paying $50 each per annum into the school fund, or a total of $4,300.” Courier-Journal, April 29, 1872
“It is stated that a gentleman in Newport, Ky., is perfecting an application of electricity for propelling a box containing letters over wires from place to place, on the telegraph principle. The experiment over wires of six hundred yards in length, has, it is said, worked to a charm.” Indiana State Journal, October30, 1851
The Louisville Post's Ralph Coghlan wrote about Newport in 1923.  Read it here. Paragraphs about Newport's leading manufacturers and merchants, from 1886, here. (pdf)
Newport's George Hipshire having lost his eyesight, and being unable to work, started writing poetry.  He lived on Overton in Newport, and you can read samples of his work here and here.
“November 19, 1822.  Col. Richard M. Johnson [Wikipedia] presents, in the U. S. Senate, the petition of John Cleves Symmes [Wikipedia], a citizen of Newport, Ky., (a nephew and namesake of [Cincinnati founder] Judge Symmes [Wikipedia], who made the first settlement between the Miami Rivers in Ohio), for aid in performing a voyage of discovery to the inside of the earth, through the poles - which he claimed were open, and that the interior of the earth was accessible and habitable.  His theory [Wikipedia] attracts much attention, and ridicule, and is since known as 'Symmes' Hole.'” from  Collins' History of Kentucky
Black man beaten and fined for not voting, story here. “A dispatch received here mentions that ten slaves made their escape recently from Newport, Ky., and that their whereabouts was unknown.”  NY Times, June 24, 1853

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“Two weekly papers have just made their appearance at Newport, the issue of one being but one week in advance of the other. The first is the Campbell County Leader, published by J. B. and A. L. Quinby, and the second is the Newport News, of which Mr. J. H. Ferris is the editor. Both, as they have come to us, are filled with much interesting local and miscellaneous reading matter, and are a substantial evidence of the growing importance and prosperity of Newport. If they should bear out the promise of their first publications they cannot fail in proving of great advantage to the local interests of the city and section.” Courier-Journal, April 9, 1872

“The Newport News has suspended after the publication of two issues.” Courier-Journal, April 30, 1872

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And last but not least - well, maybe least - you can hear the
 Cincinnati Jug Band's Newport Blues, c. 1929, here.
(big file - give it a few seconds)

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