publicschools

  Arnold Public School, Newport Arnold School


 

Public School, 7th and Park Park Avenue School, Newport Park Avenue School, Newport, 1907

 

 Fourth Street School and Playgrounds, Newport, KY  1923. The current school replaced this one in 1936.
 
Fourth Street Public School
 in Newport, 1912
To Gertrude Duerr, on Carthage Avenue, Cincinnati: "Dear Friend, I would like to meet you at Bott's Dancing Academy Saturday
night December 2 1/2. I will be there with bells on. I remain your friend. Wm. Schoenfield"
 Fourth Street School and Playgrounds, Newport, KY  1923. The current school replaced this one in 1936.
 
A Free School has been operated on  this site continuously since 1790

 

    

 Southgate Street School
The Southgate School was an Afro-American School.  It closed after
schools were integrated in 1955.

Tenth Street School York Street School First District School, Newport Ninth Street School, Newport


 

Free School, Newport
Ballouís Pictorial Drawing-Room Companion, circa 1860, presents the Free School, Newport, "a fine substantial brick building, well adapted to the purposes for which it was erected.   The pupils in this school, under competent teachers, who are  liberally paid for their services, receive an excellent education.   The school is in an excellent condition, and the pupils evince a  great interest in their teachers and zeal in their studies."


 


Prof. John G. Burke was one
time superintendent of
Newport Schools, died on
Jan. 19, 1925 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery.




This is Mildred Dean's picture from
 the 1930 Holmes High School Yearbook. She was a senior that
year.  She died in 1958, while
 principal of the 4th Street
 Elementary School

This is Anderson D. Owens,
 for whom the A. D. Owens Elementary School was named.  He became Newport school's superintendent in 1926 and served for 23 years.

 

The oldest information I find on Newport Schools are these items.

Keturah Moss DeMoss's 1939 History of the Old Brick School in Newport is here.  (pdf)

A serious error in the building of an 1890 Newport school goes from bad to much worse, here.

"Mr. and Mrs. George Payne, pioneer school teachers from Virginia, announced to the people of Newport that they will receive on their home boys and girls between the ages of five and fourteen for instruction in the rudiments of knowledge, consisting of reading, writing, and arithmetic.  Terms, $2.00 per quarter of eleven weeks.  Hours, 8:00 to 12:00 A. M., and 1:00 to 4:00 P.M."     Cincinnati Daily Gazette, August 1, 1810

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